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Probiotics and mastitis: evidence-based marketing?

journal contribution
posted on 16.02.2021, 05:43 by Lisa AmirLisa Amir, Laura GriffinLaura Griffin, Meabh CullinaneMeabh Cullinane, SM Garland
© 2016 The Author(s). Probiotics are defined as live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer health benefits on the host. Scientists have isolated various strains of Lactobacilli from human milk (such as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius), and the presence of these organisms is thought to be protective against breast infections, or mastitis. Trials of probiotics for treating mastitis in dairy cows have had mixed results: some successful and others unsuccessful. To date, only one trial of probiotics to treat mastitis in women and one trial to prevent mastitis have been published. Although trials of probiotics to prevent mastitis in breastfeeding women are still in progress, health professionals in Australia are receiving marketing of these products. High quality randomised controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of mastitis.

History

Publication Date

01/01/2016

Journal

International Breastfeeding Journal

Volume

11

Issue

1

Article Number

ARTN 19

Pagination

5p. (p. 1-5)

Publisher

BioMed Central

ISSN

1746-4358

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.