La Trobe
1163291_Phillips,W_2021.pdf (1.41 MB)

Understanding extracellular vesicle and nanoparticle heterogeneity: Novel methods and considerations

Download (1.41 MB)
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of membrane-enclosed nanoparticles released by cells. They play a role in intercellular communication and are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Cells release subpopulations of EVs with distinct composition and inherent biological function which overlap in size. Current size-based isolation methods are, therefore, not optimal to discriminate between functional EV subpopulations. In addition, EVs overlap in size with several other biological nanoparticles, such as lipoproteins and viruses. Proteomic analysis has allowed for more detailed study of EV composition, and EV isolation approaches based on this could provide a promising alternative for purification based on size. Elucidating EV heterogeneity and the characteristics and role of EV subpopulations will advance our understanding of EV biology and the role of EVs in health and disease. Here, we discuss current knowledge of EV composition, EV heterogeneity and advances in affinity based EV isolation tools.

Funding

National Health and Medical Research Council

History

Publication Date

01/01/2021

Journal

Proteomics

Volume

21

Issue

13-14

Article Number

ARTN e2000118

Pagination

16p.

Publisher

WILEY

ISSN

1615-9853

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.