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The 'Tricky Dance' of Advocacy: A study of non-legal Mental Health Advocacy

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posted on 2023-06-02, 00:14 authored by Wanda Bennetts, Chris MayleaChris Maylea, Brian McKenna, Helen Makregiorgos

Advocacy in compulsory mental health settings is complex and contested, incorporating legal, non-legal, representational and best interests advocacy. This paper presents an approach to non-legal representational advocacy used by Independent Mental Health Advocacy (IMHA), in Victoria, Australia, drawing on in-depth qualitative interviews with advocates and other key stakeholders. After outlining the Victorian context and the IMHA model, this paper shows how IMHA privileges the consumer voice using representational advocacy, which is rights-based and works for systemic change. Using a supported decision-making model, the paper highlights the enablers and challenges which exist, before discussing the implications in terms of rights, power, capacity building and systemic change. The participants saw IMHA as working to address one of the most troubling tensions in mental health care, between the perceived need for coercion and the need to support people to make their own decisions. Representational advocacy provides a clear, easily transferable and tested framework for engaging in supported decision-making processes with people in the mental health system.

History

Publication Date

2018-10-25

Journal

International Journal of Mental Health and Capacity Law

Volume

2018

Issue

24

Pagination

20p. (p. 12-31)

Publisher

Northumbria University Library

ISSN

2056-3922

Rights Statement

© The Authors 2018. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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