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Smoking cessation intervention in Australian general practice: a secondary analysis of a cluster randomised controlled trial

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posted on 13.07.2021, 23:07 by RK Gobarani, NA Zwar, G Russell, MJ Abramson, B Bonevski, Anne HollandAnne Holland, E Paul, Narelle CoxNarelle Cox, S Wilson, J George
Background GPs have limited capacity to routinely provide smoking cessation support. New strategies are needed to reach all smokers within this setting. Aim To evaluate the effect of a pharmacist-coordinated interdisciplinary smoking cessation intervention delivered in Australian general practice. Design and setting Secondary analysis of a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) conducted in 41 Australian general practices. Method In all, 690 current smokers were included in this study: 373 from intervention clinics (n = 21) and 317 from control clinics (n = 18). A total of 166 current smokers had spirometry-confirmed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the intervention clinics, trained pharmacists provided smoking cessation support plus Quitline referral. Control clinics provided usual care plus Quitline referral. Those with COPD in the intervention group (n = 84) were referred for home medicines review (HMR) and home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HomeBase), which included further smoking cessation support. Outcomes included carbon monoxide (CO)-validated smoking abstinence, self-reported use of smoking cessation aids, and differences between groups in readiness-to-quit score at 6 months. Results Intention-to-treat analysis showed similar CO-validated abstinence rates at 6 months in the intervention (4.0%) and control clinics (3.5%). No differences were observed in readiness-to-quit scores between groups at 6 months. CO-validated abstinence rates were similar in those who completed HMR and at least six sessions of HomeBase to those with COPD in usual care. Conclusion A pharmacist-coordinated interdisciplinary smoking cessation intervention when integrated in a general practice setting had no advantages over usual care. Further research is needed to evaluate the effect of HMR and home-based pulmonary rehabilitation on smoking abstinence in smokers with COPD.

Funding

The RADICALS trial received funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) through the NHMRC Partnerships for Better Health - Partnership Projects initiative (APP1076255). Cash and/or in-kind contributions were received from partner organisations: Lung Foundation Australia, Boehringer Ingelheim Pty Ltd, and Eastern Melbourne Primary Health Network (PHN).

History

Publication Date

01/06/2021

Journal

British Journal of General Practice

Volume

71

Issue

707

Pagination

(p. e458-e464)

Publisher

Royal College of General Practitioners

ISSN

0960-1643

Rights Statement

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