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Self-Medication Practice and Associated Factors among Residents in Wuhan, China

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posted on 15.11.2022, 06:18 authored by Xiaosheng Lei, Heng JiangHeng Jiang, Chaojie LiuChaojie Liu, John FerrierJohn Ferrier, Janette MugavinJanette Mugavin
Background: This study aims to examine the prevalence and predictors associated with self-medication, and related consequences in Wuhan, China. Methods: Two-hundred-sixty residents were interviewed from randomly selected four districts of Wuhan, China. A modified version of Anderson’s health behavioral model was used in the survey to collect information of self-medication behavior. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to measure correlates of the prevalence of self-medication. Results: Nearly half of the respondents would select self-medication, and 39.1% would see a doctor if they felt sick. The most common self-medicated illnesses were cold and cough, cardiovascular disease and gastrointestinal disease. The main reasons for self-medication were that the illness was not severe (enough) to see the doctor (45%); the patient did not think that the trouble of seeing a doctor was worth the effort (23%); the patient had no time to see the doctor (12%), and the patient did not want to pay high medical costs (15%). Logistic regression results suggested that respondents tended to select self-medication if the illness was minor or short-term (less than seven days). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that more strict regulation on over-the-counter medicines may be required to reduce health risks related to self-medication. Targeted health education on the risks of self-medication should be considered.

Funding

The authors are grateful to the investigators and study participants who contributed their precious time for data collection. This study was supported by the China Studies Research Center, La Trobe University.

History

Publication Date

04/01/2018

Journal

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume

15

Issue

1

Article Number

68

Pagination

10p. (p. 1-10)

Publisher

MDPI

ISSN

1661-7827

Rights Statement

© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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