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Pursuing Trade Union Internationalism: Australia's Waterside Workers and the International Transport Workers Federation, c. 1950-70

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journal contribution
posted on 30.03.2021, 05:24 by Diane KirkbyDiane Kirkby, Dmytro OstapenkoDmytro Ostapenko
© 2016 Australian Society for the Study of Labour History. When the Australian Waterside Workers Federation (WWF) decided in 1971 to join the International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) it overturned decades of antipathy to the ITF. We ask why union officials held this view and why the union now changed its mind at this particular moment. We argue that while union power was strong in the immediate post-war decades, the WWF was able to pursue its economic goals locally and join international actions for reasons of solidarity. In the following decade, however, union archives reveal that a confluence of technological change and diminishing union strength under a conservative government made international organising a logical and necessary strategy. Under the guidance of General Secretary Charlie Fitzgibbon, the WWF overcame its opposition to the ITF, by then an organisation representing millions of workers worldwide. We concentrate on Fitzgibbon's leadership as a crucial factor in the timing of this historic change.

Funding

Research for this article was funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Project with the Maritime Union of Australia. We wish to thank the ARC, the MUA and the Labour History's three anonymous referees for their help.

History

Publication Date

01/01/2016

Journal

Labour History: a journal of labour and social history

Volume

110

Issue

110

Pagination

19p. (p. 57-75)

Publisher

Australian Society for the Study of Labour History

ISSN

0023-6942

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

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