La Trobe
1331417_Martoni,F_2023.pdf (37.82 MB)

Non-destructive insect metabarcoding for surveillance and biosecurity in citrus orchards: recording the good, the bad and the psyllids

Download (37.82 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 2024-02-07, 23:49 authored by Francesco Martoni, Reannon Smith, Alexander PiperAlexander Piper, Jessica Lye, Conrad TrollipConrad Trollip, Brendan RodoniBrendan Rodoni, Mark J Blacket
Background: The Australian citrus industry remains one of the few in the world to be unaffected by the African and the Asian citrus psyllids, Trioza erytreae Del Guercio and Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, respectively, and the diseases their vectored bacteria can cause. Surveillance, early detection, and strict quarantine measures are therefore fundamental to safeguard Australian citrus. However, long-term targeted surveillance for exotic citrus pests can be a time-consuming and expensive activity, often relying on manually screening large numbers of trap samples and morphological identification of specimens, which requires a high level of taxonomic knowledge. Methods: Here we evaluated the use of non-destructive insect metabarcoding for exotic pest surveillance in citrus orchards. We conducted an 11-week field trial, between the months of December and February, at a horticultural research farm (SuniTAFE Smart Farm) in the Northwest of Victoria, Australia, and processed more than 250 samples collected from three types of invertebrate traps across four sites. Results: The whole-community metabarcoding data enabled comparisons between different trapping methods, demonstrated the spatial variation of insect diversity across the same orchard, and highlighted how comprehensive assessment of insect biodiversity requires use of multiple complimentary trapping methods. In addition to revealing the diversity of native psyllid species in citrus orchards, the non-targeted metabarcoding approach identified a diversity of other pest and beneficial insects and arachnids within the trap bycatch, and recorded the presence of the triozid Casuarinicola cf warrigalensis for the first time in Victoria. Ultimately, this work highlights how a non-targeted surveillance approach for insect monitoring coupled with non-destructive DNA metabarcoding can provide accurate and high-throughput species identification for biosecurity and biodiversity monitoring.

Funding

This work was supported by the iMapPESTS project, Horticulture Innovation Australia: ST16010, Australian Government Department of Agriculture as part of its Rural R & D for Profit program.

History

Publication Date

2023-08-15

Journal

PeerJ

Volume

11

Article Number

e15831

Pagination

30p.

Publisher

PeerJ

ISSN

2167-8359

Rights Statement

© 2023 Martoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, reproduction and adaptation in any medium and for any purpose provided that it is properly attributed. For attribution, the original author(s), title, publication source (PeerJ) and either DOI or URL of the article must be cited.

Usage metrics

    Journal Articles

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC