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More than mateship: exploring how Australian male expatriates, longer-term and frequent travellers experience social support

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posted on 2024-02-07, 06:10 authored by G Crawford, R Lobo, B Maycock, Graham BrownGraham Brown
Purpose: Those travelling overseas for work or leisure including male expatriates, longer-term and frequent travellers (ELoFTs) may be at heightened risk for a range of health and wellbeing issues. Social support may mediate this risk. However, from a public health perspective, little is written about how ELoFTs access health information and support and the role of their social networks in facilitating health and wellbeing outcomes. This research was part of a study examining social network processes of Australian male ELoFTs travelling, living, or working in Southeast Asia (SEA). Methods: Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory were the conceptual framework and methodology supporting semi-structured, in-depth interviews (n = 25) conducted in Australia and Thailand with Australian male ELoFTs to SEA, aged 18 years or older. Results: Findings highlight supports that assist ELoFT transition and adjustment to country of destination or manage their transnational experience. Influential places, people, and points in the migration journey mediated engagement with social support. Conclusions: ELoFT social networks and the support provided within them may provide a mechanism for intervention across a range of public health issues. Findings may support the development of policy and practice across industries charged with supporting successful ELoFT adjustment.

History

Publication Date

2023-12-31

Journal

International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being

Volume

18

Issue

1

Article Number

2251222

Pagination

14p.

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

ISSN

1748-2623

Rights Statement

© 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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