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Implementing Good Life with osteoArthritis from Denmark (GLA:D®) in Australian public hospitals. Part 2: service providers’ perceptions

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posted on 2024-06-07, 06:33 authored by Michelle A Cottrell, Maree E Raymer, Liam R Maclachlan, Viana Vuvan, Michelle D Smith, Shaun P O’Leary, Bill Vicenzino, Tracy Comans, Joanne KempJoanne Kemp, Christian BartonChristian Barton, Natalie CollinsNatalie Collins
Background: Previous literature has reported the successful implementation of the Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D®) program into predominantly private practice settings. There may be unique challenges present within the public hospital setting that influence GLA:D® implementation in public health. Objective: Explore the attitudes and experiences of service providers directly involved in implementing GLA:D® in Australian public tertiary hospitals. Design: Qualitative descriptive study design. Method: Service providers (n = 14) from three participating hospitals took part in semi-structured focus groups at the completion of the 6-month implementation period. Inductive thematic analysis was employed to identify primary domains across all facilities. Results: Four broad domains were identified. Factors that influenced uptake included GLA:D® being a recognisable, evidence-based product requiring minimal development or adaptation. The fidelity of the GLA:D® Australia program was challenged by referral of patients with multiple/complex medical comorbidities, and patient preference to complete registry data via paper rather than online. Several operational considerations are required when delivering GLA:D® in a public hospital setting, including adequate numbers of GLA:D®-trained staff, additional screening requirements, obtaining appropriate clinical space, and persisting patient barriers to attending the service. GLA:D® provided benefits beyond improvement in pain and function, including social interactivity, high attendance and promotion of long-term self-management, while also maximising service efficiencies. Conclusions: Implementing GLA:D® in Australian public hospitals was supported by service providers. Specific operational and administrative factors, including staff training, patient complexity, and registry requirements should be considered when attempting to embed and sustain GLA:D® in large Australian public tertiary hospitals.

Funding

This study was funded by a 2020 Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) Foundation (Australia) Project Grant.

History

Publication Date

2024-06-01

Journal

Musculoskeletal Science and Practice

Volume

71

Article Number

102961

Pagination

6p.

Publisher

Elsevier

ISSN

2468-8630

Rights Statement

© 2024 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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