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Hydration Status and Fluid Replacement Strategies of High-Performance Adolescent Athletes: An Application of Machine Learning to Distinguish Hydration Characteristics

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posted on 08.12.2021, 22:38 by Haresh SuppiahHaresh Suppiah, Ee Ling Ng, Jericho Wee, Bernadette Cherianne Taim, Minh HuynhMinh Huynh, Paul GastinPaul Gastin, Michael Chia, Chee Yong Low, Jason KW Lee
There are limited data on the fluid balance characteristics and fluid replenishment behaviors of high-performance adolescent athletes. The heterogeneity of hydration status and practices of adolescent athletes warrant efficient approaches to individualizing hydration strategies. This study aimed to evaluate and characterize the hydration status and fluid balance characteristics of high-performance adolescent athletes and examine the differences in fluid consumption behaviors during training. In total, 105 high-performance adolescent athletes (male: 66, female: 39; age 14.1 ± 1.0 y) across 11 sports had their hydration status assessed on three separate occasions—upon rising and before a low and a high-intensity training session (pre-training). The results showed that 20–44% of athletes were identified as hypohydrated, with 21–44% and 15–34% of athletes commencing low- and high-intensity training in a hypohydrated state, respectively. Linear mixed model (LMM) analyses revealed that athletes who were hypohydrated consumed more fluid (F (1.183.85)) = 5.91, (p = 0.016). Additional K-means cluster analyses performed highlighted three clusters: “Heavy sweaters with sufficient compensatory hydration habits,” “Heavy sweaters with insufficient compensatory hydration habits” and “Light sweaters with sufficient compensatory hydration habits”. Our results highlight that high-performance adolescent athletes with ad libitum drinking have compensatory mechanisms to replenish fluids lost from training. The approach to distinguish athletes by hydration characteristics could assist practitioners in prioritizing future hydration intervention protocols.

History

Publication Date

15/11/2021

Journal

Nutrients

Volume

13

Issue

11

Article Number

nu13114073

Pagination

15p.

Publisher

MDPI

ISSN

2072-6643

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The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

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