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Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes

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posted on 2023-02-01, 01:39 authored by A Bergstroem, Nano NagleNano Nagle, Yuan Chen, Shane McCarthy, MO Pollard, Qasim Ayub, Stephen Wilcox, Leah WilcoxLeah Wilcox, Roland van OorschotRoland van Oorschot, P McAllister, Leslie Williams, Yali Xue, R John Mitchell, Chris Tyler-Smith
Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C-, present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia.

Funding

Our work was supported by Wellcome Trust grant 098051.

History

Publication Date

2016-03-21

Journal

Current Biology

Volume

26

Issue

6

Pagination

5p. (p. 809-813)

Publisher

Elsevier

ISSN

1879-0445

Rights Statement

© 2016 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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