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Current Australian speech-language pathology practice in addressing psychological well-being in people with aphasia after stroke.pdf (932.63 kB)
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Current Australian speech-language pathology practice in addressing psychological well-being in people with aphasia after stroke

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This is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology: Jasvinder K. Sekhon, Jacinta Douglas & Miranda L. Rose (2015) Current Australian speech-language pathology practice in addressing psychological well-being in people with aphasia after stroke, International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 17:3, 252-262, DOI: 10.3109/17549507.2015.1024170. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
© 2015 The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Limited.
Purpose: Psychological well-being is essential to overall health; however, there is a paucity of research on how to address psychological well-being in stroke survivors with aphasia. This study describes the current beliefs, attitudes and practices of Australian speech-language pathologists in addressing psychological well-being in people with aphasia after stroke. Method: A 26-item web-based survey consisting of open and closed questions was distributed to Australian speech-language pathologists through four electronic databases. Result: Australian speech-language pathologists (n = 111) utilized counselling and clinical approaches to address psychological well-being in people with post-stroke aphasia. The majority of speech-language pathologists did not feel comfortable with addressing psychological well-being in people with aphasia and sought support from other health professionals in this practice. Self-perception of being under-skilled was the main barrier identified to adequate practice in this domain, followed by inadequate time, inadequate staffing and people with aphasia declining referral to counselling. The main facilitators reported by speech-language pathologists to address psychological well-being included personal interest, personal and professional experience and availability of counselling health professionals for people with aphasia. There were small-to-medium statistically significant correlations between speech-language pathologists reporting additional training in counselling and perceived knowledge of, confidence in and satisfaction with managing psychological well-being in people with aphasia. Conclusion: This study identifies factors requiring attention in order to enable speech-language pathologists to facilitate improved psychological well-being in people with aphasia.

Funding

This study was undertaken as a requirement towards post-graduate qualifications by Jasvinder Sekhon. The second author was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT 100100446). The authors report no conflicts of interest. The authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the paper.

History

Publication Date

04/05/2015

Journal

International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

Volume

17

Issue

3

Pagination

11p. (p. 252-262)

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

ISSN

1754-9507

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.