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Characteristics of voluntary reporting of adverse drug events related to antipsychotics in Australia: 14-year analysis

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posted on 05.07.2021, 04:02 by Hanan Khalil, Dimitra Hoppe, Nabil Ameen
Background: Retrospective analyses of large databases of treated patients can provide useful links to the presence of drug misuse or rare and infrequent adverse effects, such as agranulocytosis, diabetic ketoacidosis or neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The aim of this study is to describe the adverse effects to antipsychotics reported in the Australian Database of Adverse Event Notifications (DAEN). Methods: Data were collected from the DAEN – a spontaneous reporting database. The database, which covered the period from January 2004 to December 2017, was obtained from the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website (www.TGA.gov). The drugs selected for this investigation are the following: aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, paliperidone, risperidone, ziprasidone, quetiapine, haloperidol and pimozide. All data were analysed descriptively. Comparison of reporting and management of adverse events between adults (older than 20 years) and children (5–19 years) was undertaken using chi squared test, where p < 0.05 is significant. Results: A total of 7122 adverse events associated with the antipsychotics aripiprazole, clozapine, haloperidol, olanzapine, paliperidone, pimozide, quetiapine and risperidone were reported to the TGA between January 2004 and December 2017. On average, there were 2.6 adverse events reported for each case. The most common adverse event reported for antipsychotics was neuroleptic malignant syndrome. There were no significant differences in the number of co-medications, formulations, indications, therapeutic dose, hospital admission and overdose among the antipsychotics between paediatric and adult populations. However, there were significant differences between causality, death and the management of adverse events between adult and paediatric populations (5–19 years) (p < 0.05, chi squared test). Conclusion: The antipsychotic drug associated with the highest adverse events in adults was clozapine, followed by olanzapine. The most common adverse event in adults, and reported with a number of antipsychotic drugs, was neuroleptic malignant syndrome. In children, the highest numbers of adverse events reported in the database were associated with risperidone, clozapine and olanzapine. Plain language summary: Adverse events reported of antipsychotics Background: Retrospective analyses of large databases of treated patients can provide useful clues to the presence of drug misuse or rare and infrequent adverse effects associated with antipsychotics. The drugs selected for this investigation are the following: aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, paliperidone, risperidone, ziprasidone, quetiapine, haloperidol and pimozide. Methods: All data were analysed descriptively and investigated for any associations between the variables collected. Comparison of reporting and management of adverse events between adults (older than 20 years) and children (5–19 years) was undertaken using chi squared test, where p < 0.05 is significant. Results: The antipsychotic drug associated with the highest adverse events was clozapine, followed by olanzapine. In children, the highest numbers of adverse events reported in the database were associated with risperidone, clozapine and olanzapine. The most common adverse event in adults, and reported with a number of antipsychotic drugs, was neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Conclusion: There were significant differences between causality, death and the management of adverse events between adult and paediatric populations (5–19 years).Keywords: Antipsychotics, adverse effects, adverse events, safety

History

Publication Date

01/01/2021

Journal

Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety

Volume

12

Pagination

14p.

Publisher

SAGE

ISSN

2042-0986

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The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

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