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Being your best: Protocol for a feasibility study of a codesigned approach to reduce symptoms of frailty in people aged 65 years or more after transition from hospital

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journal contribution
posted on 12.05.2021, 00:23 by JA Lowthian, M Green, Claudia Meyer, E Cyarto, E Robinson, A Mills, F Sutherland, AM Hutchinson, DV Smit, L Boyd, K Walker, H Newnham, M Rose
Introduction The population is ageing, with increasing health and supportive care needs. For older people, complex chronic health conditions and frailty can lead to a cascade of repeated hospitalisations and further decline. Existing solutions are fragmented and not person centred. The proposed Being Your Best programme integrates care across hospital and community settings to address symptoms of frailty. Methods and analysis A multicentre pragmatic mixed methods study aiming to recruit 80 community-dwelling patients aged ≥65 years recently discharged from hospital. Being Your Best is a codesigned 6-month programme that provides referral and linkage with existing services comprising four modules to prevent or mitigate symptoms of physical, nutritional, cognitive and social frailty. Feasibility will be assessed in terms of recruitment, acceptability of the intervention to participants and level of retention in the programme. Changes in frailty (Modified Reported Edmonton Frail Scale), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), functional ability (Barthel and Lawton), loneliness (University of California Los Angeles Loneliness Scale-3 items) and nutrition (Malnutrition Screening Tool) will also be measured at 6 and 12 months. Ethics and dissemination The study has received approval from Monash Health Human Research Ethics Committee (RES-19-0000904L). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference and seminar presentations.

Funding

This work is supported by Monash Partners Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) Rapid Applied Research Translation (Award number M15001 3272941).

History

Publication Date

05/03/2021

Journal

BMJ Open

Volume

11

Issue

3

Article Number

ARTN e043223

Pagination

6p.

Publisher

BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP

ISSN

2044-6055

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