La Trobe
1202771_Tham,R_2022.pdf (311.58 kB)

Associations between Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Cognitive Function in Australian Urban Settings: The Moderating Role of Diabetes Status

Download (311.58 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 2022-10-17, 05:32 authored by Rachel ThamRachel Tham, AJ Wheeler, A Carver, D Dunstan, D Donaire-Gonzalez, KJ Anstey, Jonathan ShawJonathan Shaw, DJ Magliano, E Martino, A Barnett, E Cerin
Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with lower cognitive function and diabetes in older adults, but little is known about whether diabetes status moderates the impact of TRAP on older adult cognitive function. We analysed cross-sectional data from 4141 adults who participated in the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study in 2011–2012. TRAP exposure was estimated using major and minor road density within multiple residential buffers. Cognitive function was assessed with validated psychometric scales, including: California Verbal Learning Test (memory) and Symbol–Digit Modalities Test (processing speed). Diabetes status was measured using oral glucose tolerance tests. We observed positive associations of some total road density measures with memory but not processing speed. Minor road density was not associated with cognitive function, while major road density showed positive associations with memory and processing speed among larger buffers. Within a 300 m buffer, the relationship between TRAP and memory tended to be positive in controls (β = 0.005; p = 0.062), but negative in people with diabetes (β = −0.013; p = 0.026) and negatively associated with processing speed in people with diabetes only (β = −0.047; p = 0.059). Increased TRAP exposure may be positively associated with cognitive function among urban-dwelling people, but this benefit may not extend to those with diabetes.

Funding

This work was supported by a program grant ("The environment, active living and cognitive health: building the evidence base") from the Australian Catholic University (grant number ACURF18). Jonathan E. Shaw is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Investigator Grant (grant number 1173952). Kaarin J. Anstey is funded by an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship (grant number FL190100011).

History

Publication Date

2022-05-27

Journal

Toxics

Volume

10

Issue

6

Article Number

289

Pagination

12p.

Publisher

MDPI

ISSN

2305-6304

Rights Statement

© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Usage metrics

    Journal Articles

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC