La Trobe
2022 - Molecules - Analysis of Citrus Bioflavonoid Content and Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitory Potential of Commercially Available Supplements.pdf (625.1 kB)
Download file

Analysis of Citrus Bioflavonoid Content and Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitory Potential of Commercially Available Supplements

Download (625.1 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 03.08.2022, 07:43 authored by Ankit Gupta, Hayder Al-AubaidyHayder Al-Aubaidy, Christian Narkowicz, Herbert Jelinek, David Nichols, John Burgess, Glenn Jacobson

Citrus bioflavonoids are polyphenolic plant-derived pigments found in high levels in oranges, lemons, grapefruits and other citrus fruits. The three most abundant types of citrus bioflavonoids are hesperidin, naringenin and eriocitrin. Citrus bioflavonoids have long been known to possess powerful free radical-scavenging properties and cardioprotective effects. The study involved the analysis of 10 commercially available citrus bioflavonoid supplements from three different countries: Australia, the United States and Canada. The supplements were tested for their citrus bioflavonoid content which varied from 0.8 to 33.3% w/w. The daily bioflavonoid dose varied from 19 mg to 560 mg. Hesperidin was the major citrus bioflavonoid in nine out of ten supplements. One supplement was found to contain less than 10% of the quantity of rutin claimed to have been added. The DPP-4 inhibitory potential, compared through an estimation of rutin equivalence, ranged from 1.9 mg to 400 mg per day. This data highlights the variability between the supplements in their potential to inhibit DPP-4 for subsequent health benefits. 

Funding

This research was partially funded from Tasmanian Community Funds, grant number 230816.

History

Publication Date

25/07/2022

Journal

Molecules

Volume

27

Issue

15

Article Number

4741

Pagination

8p.

Publisher

Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)

ISSN

1420-3049

Rights Statement

© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Usage metrics

Categories

Licence

Exports