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Playing the climate game: climate change impacts, resilience and adaptation in the climate-dependent sport sector

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journal contribution
posted on 05.11.2020, 00:21 by Bob Stewart, Gregory Dingle
© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The aims of this study were to understand issues that climate change poses for major Australian sport stadia and the organizations that manage them, and any organizational responses to such issues. Like climate-dependent agriculture and tourism, the sport sector is potentially vulnerable to climate change impacts, yet has largely been overlooked in empirical research. The results reveal four primary climate change issues: organizational uncertainty; greater management complexity and cost risks associated with water and energy resources, and waste outputs. No revenue opportunities were evident. The results demonstrate that while most physical impacts are manageable, the primacy of commercial and operational imperatives determine organizational responses ahead of government climate policy, and any direct climate “signal” to adapt. Ten factors shape three organizational responses that we have typed using Berkhout’s [2012, Adaptation to climate change by organizations. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 3(1), 91–106] adaptation framework. The results challenge the assumption that climate change impacts and responses are limited to non-sport and leisure industries.

History

Publication Date

30/09/2018

Journal

Managing Sport and Leisure

Volume

23

Issue

4-6

Pagination

22p. (p. 293-314)

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

ISSN

2375-0472

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

Licence

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