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2018-Sarker et al-Scientific Reports-Molecular characterization of the first saltwater crocodilepox virus genome sequences from the world’s largest living member of the Crocodylia.pdf (2.74 MB)

Molecular characterization of the first saltwater crocodilepox virus genome sequences from the world’s largest living member of the Crocodylia

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posted on 06.11.2020, 06:33 by Subir Sarker, Sally R Isberg, Natalie L Milic, Peter Lock, Karla Helbig
© 2018 The Author(s). Crocodilepox virus is a large dsDNA virus belonging to the genus Crocodylidpoxvirus, which infects a wide range of host species in the order Crocodylia worldwide. Here, we present genome sequences for a novel saltwater crocodilepox virus, with two subtypes (SwCRV-1 and -2), isolated from the Australian saltwater crocodile. Affected belly skins of juvenile saltwater crocodiles were used to sequence complete viral genomes, and perform electron microscopic analysis that visualized immature and mature virions. Analysis of the SwCRV genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity to CRV (84.53% and 83.70%, respectively), with the novel SwCRV-1 and -2 complete genome sequences missing 5 and 6 genes respectively when compared to CRV, but containing 45 and 44 predicted unique genes. Similar to CRV, SwCRV also lacks the genes involved in virulence and host range, however, considering the presence of numerous hypothetical and or unique genes in the SwCRV genomes, it is completely reasonable that the genes encoding these functions are present but not recognized. Phylogenetic analysis suggested a monophyletic relationship between SwCRV and CRV, however, SwCRV is quite distinct from other chordopoxvirus genomes. These are the first SwCRV complete genome sequences isolated from saltwater crocodile skin lesions.

Funding

The authors are extremely grateful to Securing Food, Water and Environment, RFA, ABC Research Funding Scheme 2017, and the centre for Crocodile Research, Noonamah, Australia for funding this research (Project ID: 0001027183). Additional funding for this project was generously provided by Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (Project ID: PRJ-010453). The authors also like to acknowledge the Latrobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS) Bioimaging Facility for the use of Transmission Electron Microscope.

Securing Food, Water and Environment, RFA, ABC Research Funding Scheme

centre for Crocodile Research, Noonamah, Australia | 0001027183

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation | PRJ-010453

History

Publication Date

01/01/2018

Journal

Scientific Reports

Volume

8

Issue

1

Article Number

ARTN 5623

Pagination

11p. (p. 1-11)

Publisher

Springer Nature

ISSN

2045-2322

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