La Trobe

File(s) not publicly available

Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility

chapter
posted on 10.02.2021, 23:36 by JCO Koh, Susan HoebeeSusan Hoebee, EJ Newbigin
© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Most flowering plants are hermaphrodites with flowers that have both male and female reproductive organs. Despite being able to self-fertilize, numerous mechanisms have evolved to prevent this from happening. The most common of these mechanisms is self-incompatibility (SI), a genetically controlled system that enables the female reproductive organ of the flower to recognize the source of each male pollen grain it receives; and to reject all 'self' pollen grains, those originating from the plant itself or one of its close relatives. Although SI systems are found in many different taxa, the underlying mechanisms appear to have arisen independently many times during flowering plant diversification because the molecules that mediate recognition are generally not the same. Here, we discuss one of the two generally recognized forms of SI, sporophytic SI, and what is currently known about the cellular mechanism that regulates this system in one plant family, the Brassicaceae.

History

Publication Date

01/01/2017

Book Title

Encyclopedia of Applied Plant Sciences

Editors

Thomas B Murray BG Murphy DJ

Publisher

Academic Press

Place of publication

Waltham, MA

Edition

2nd

Volume

2

Pagination

7p. (p. 334-340)

ISBN-13

9780123948083

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

Usage metrics

Categories

Licence

Exports