La Trobe

File(s) not publicly available

Lake Mungo, Archaeology of

chapter
posted on 17.11.2020, 05:32 by Nicola Stern
Lake Mungo came to the attention of the international paleoanthropological community during the early 1970s following the widely publicized discovery of what were then the oldest, well-dated traces of human activity on the Australian continent, including the oldest-known ritual human burials (Bowler et al. 1970, 2003; Barbetti and Allen 1972; Bowler and Thorne 1976). However, these are only a few of the thousands of activity traces preserved in the 33 km-long transverse, crescentic dune (lunette) that bounds the eastern margin of Lake Mungo; and Lake Mungo is only one of 17 large and numerous smaller overflow lakes that together cover an area of approximately 2,400 km2 on the southeast margin of the continent’s arid core (Fig. 1). These lakes are now dry, but at times in the past when temperatures and evaporation were reduced, they were filled via a former channel of the Lachlan River, which flows westward from the Australian Alps.

Funding

Australian Research Council | LP501671;DP1092966; DP150100487

History

Publication Date

01/01/2020

Book Title

Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

Editors

Smith C

Publisher

Springer

Place of publication

London

Edition

2nd

Pagination

12p. (p. 6389-6401)

ISBN-13

9783030300166

Rights Statement

The Author reserves all moral rights over the deposited text and must be credited if any re-use occurs. Documents deposited in OPAL are the Open Access versions of outputs published elsewhere. Changes resulting from the publishing process may therefore not be reflected in this document. The final published version may be obtained via the publisher’s DOI. Please note that additional copyright and access restrictions may apply to the published version.

Exports

Logo branding

Exports